Monthly Archives: August 2011

Federer Plays Erikson, Round 1

The U. S. Open tennis tournament has begun.  This is my first chance since Wimbledon to play with my idea that the seven rounds of the tournament are (almost) like the eight stages in Erik Erikson’s developmental scheme—in a narrow … Continue reading

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The Erikson Tournament: Stage 7 Explored

This is going to be a busy sort of post.  I recommend it to people who are thinking of retiring, to fans of Erik Erikson’s epigenetic stages, and to anyone who has been following these posts and who thinks I … Continue reading

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My Opponent is Really Really Stupid

President Obama doesn’t really need to be Superman to win a second term, says Timothy Egan, in a New York Times op ed piece.  He does have “Republican craziness” to run against.  One of the examples of this craziness Egan … Continue reading

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Is It Just Will Power?

So how do you feel about “will power?”  Old fashioned? Crucially necessary?  Both?  John Tierney wrote a really wonderful piece about will power in the New York Times recently.  You can see the full article here.  I’m going to reflect … Continue reading

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John and Bonnie Gray, Just Doin’ Their Jobs

I want to poke just a little today at the way John and Bonnie Gray illustrate what communication between a husband and a wife ought to look like.  John Gray is the founder of the now vast Mars/Venus industries: books, … Continue reading

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Highballs and the High Road

Imagine that this is one of the notorious “Washington Cocktail Parties.”  Maybe it is.  I don’t know.  My son, Doug, found it for me after I had spent a week looking for one.  I wanted one that played up the … Continue reading

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The Touch of a Really Good Author

Some part of the genius of Ursula Le Guin is that she hides the crucial evidence in plain sight. In her Tales From EarthSea, Le Guin gives us a little girl named Dragonfly. She first appears in a subordinate clause … Continue reading

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