Category Archives: Political Psychology

But Whitey’s goin’ to the moon

Would we be better off, do you think, if we were more sensitive to the concerns of others?  You would think so, wouldn’t you?  That notion has come very close, in the blue bubble where I live [1], to replacing all … Continue reading

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Madam Secretary 4.1

I want to think about trashy news and trashy people today.  The United States has enemies, of course, and they act against us in the old style and in the new. [1]  The old style is acting against us in … Continue reading

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Policymaking in a democracy

What will happen to the great coastal cities if the atmosphere continues to warm at the rate it is warming now? I think that is an interesting question. Even more interesting would be pictures—these would look like photographs, but would, … Continue reading

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Colin Kaepernick’s Triumph

On Sunday, I tuned in to my favorite football show, Sunday Night Football [1] and I watched Colin Kaepernick’s triumph.  I was dumbfounded.  Then I was exultant.  They introduced the teams and then the teams lined up and there was … Continue reading

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In praise of verbally defined limits and rationales

It has become a popular middle class notion [1] that saying No to a child is a bad thing. Like most of the mistakes we make as we ride the pendulum from unreasoning strictness to unthinking permissiveness, there is a … Continue reading

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“Did something happen to you?”

I intend this as a general celebration of the Netflix series, Shetland, so I will present just a little information about the series generally.  Here’s the blurb from imdb.com. Created from the novels by award winning crime writer Ann Cleeves, … Continue reading

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Moral outrage and moral rigor

Lee Siegel begins his examination of “moral rigor” by choosing an exemplar; it is James Baldwin. Siegel knows that “moral rigor” is going to be a tough sell and he is working for as much specific and acceptable material as … Continue reading

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